Handstand Block Exercises

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There are many different tools you can use to vary your handstand practice. There is the ground, parallets, blocks, chairs, benches, canes, and even people. Depending on what you are balancing on, you will have to change certain parts of your balancing technique.

Just like any type of training, when you’re able to vary parts of the exercise you will improve and get stronger faster. For example, If  you switch from regular to  thick-handled dumbbells, you are then training your grip strength as well as the strength you are directly training from the exercise you have chosen.

Here are some basic exercises to get you started with our Handstand Blocks.

2 Blocks

Ups: In tuck, straddle, and pike you can start to work on getting up into your handstand on an elevated object. If you’re working your press you can start to work on pressing up to the blocks. Once you achieve it on 2 try stacking them with 4 and then with 6.

Blocks together: Put the blocks together side by side. This will challenge your shape because there is less room for error. It’s also going to change your shoulder alignment and force you to work the flexibility of your shoulder. Once you can successfully do it with the blocks together then you can work on 2 hands on 1 block.

3 Blocks

2 + 1: In tuck, straddle, and pike work on jumping up into your handstand with one hand higher than the other. You want to have the higher arm bent slightly and focus on the alignment of the lower hand to the opposite hip.

Branches: Once you’re in a solid position start playing with the lower half of your body. Twist at the hips, straight legs, bent legs, flexed feet, pointed feet. The higher the bent arm is the easier it will be to play so you can start with 5 + 1 if you like and work your way down.

6 Blocks

Stacking: You can do stacking in front support, with your feet on a swiss ball, with your feet elevated on a block, facing the wall, or in a free handstand. The goal is to work on the alignment of your one arm. Start with the blocks stacked, take them down 1 at a time and once you reach the bottom stack them up again on the way up. Make sure you train starting with each hand so that you don’t become more dominant on one side.

Walking: This drill is to work on the weight transfer for your one arms. You can practice in any shape that you would like to achieve in a one arm. Space the blocks slightly closer than your shoulder width. This drill is about control so make sure that you have a solid free handstand before attempting to transfer to the next block. You can practice facing the wall as long as you’re only using is as spot and you’re not relying on it. If you rely on the wall then this drill is too advanced and you’ll have to work towards it. If you want to use it to train endurance then you can start trying to go there and back and increase the number of lengths you can do with good balance and alignment.

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